Obnubilate

Obnubilate

äbˈno͞obəˌlāt

Verb

  • Darken, dim, or cover with or as if with a cloud; obscure.

Get a new word in your inbox every day.

By subscribing you are agreeing to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Example Sentences

“Cory refused to allow the sudden downpour to obnubilate his good mood.”

“The car window’s dark tint obnubilated any view of who was inside.” 

“I’ll bring my big beach umbrella to keep us obnubilated all day.”

Word Origin

Latin, late 16th century

Why this word?

The power of clouds to obnubilate, both figuratively and literally, is a popular concept in music, especially from folk singer Joni Mitchell. In “Both Sides Now,” she croons, “I’ve looked at clouds from both sides now / From up and down and still somehow / It’s cloud’s illusions I recall / I really don’t know clouds at all.” This word comes directly from the Latin “obnubilat,” which means “covered with clouds or fog.”

  • More brands you’ll love

    Elevate Your Everyday

    More brands you’ll love

    Elevate Your Everyday

    Subscribe to Better Report to receive tips and tricks that will save you money, maximize your time, and improve your life.

    Subscribe to Better Report
    By clicking “Subscribe” you’re agreeing to Better Report Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

Learn a new word Dernier cri

dərnˌyā ˈkrē