Perdurable

Perdurable

pərˈdo͝orəb(ə)l

Adjective

  • Enduring continuously; imperishable.

Get a new word in your inbox every day.

By subscribing you are agreeing to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Example Sentences

One selling point of cast-iron cookware is how seemingly perdurable it is.

My grandfather always claimed his love for my grandmother was perdurable.

Mozart’s influence on music has proved to be perdurable.

Word Origin

Latin, late 13th century

Why this word?

“Perdurable” comes to us from late Middle English via Old French. It derives from the late Latin “perdurabilis,” which stems from Latin “perdurare,” meaning “endure.” You’d be hard-pressed to find anything more perdurable than xenon-124: At 18 sextillion years, it has the longest half-life of any material that’s been directly measured in a lab. For some perspective, 18 sextillion years is about 1 trillion times the age of the universe.

  • More brands you’ll love

    Elevate Your Everyday

    More brands you’ll love

    Elevate Your Everyday

    Subscribe to Better Report to receive tips and tricks that will save you money, maximize your time, and improve your life.

    Subscribe to Better Report
    By clicking “Subscribe” you’re agreeing to Better Report Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

Learn a new word Tintinnabulation

ˌtin(t)əˌnabyəˈlāSH(ə)n