Obdurate

Obdurate

ˈäbd(y)ərət

Adjective

  • Stubbornly refusing to change one’s opinion or course of action.

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Example Sentences

“He was obdurate in his plan to finish painting the house before the forecasted rain.”

“If you’re going to be obdurate about going to the game, at least take a snack with you.”

“Nature’s weather forces are obdurate and cannot always be avoided.”

Word Origin

Latin, mid-15th century

Why this word?

“The past didn’t like to be changed. It was obdurate.” So learns Jake Epping, the protagonist in Stephen King’s time-travel tome, “11/22/63.” The adjective “obdurate,” meaning “stubbornly refusing to change one’s opinion or course of action,” is employed several times through the course of the book as Jake reflects on his quest to indeed change the course of history, specifically JFK’s assassination.

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