Mendacious

Mendacious

menˈdāSHəs

Adjective

  • Not telling the truth; lying.

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Example Sentences

“I was quite mendacious as a child, but now I don’t even like to tell a fib.”

“The first witness was mendacious, but the real story came out eventually.”

“I had to be mendacious in order to keep the surprise, but the big reveal was worth it.”

Word Origin

Latin, early 17th century

Why this word?

“Mendacious” comes from the Latin “mendax,” meaning “lying.” One of the most mendacious figures in literature is the Boy Who Cried Wolf. In the fable, a young boy regularly lies about a wolf attacking his sheep. When a wolf actually does attack his sheep, the townspeople don’t believe him, and he learns his lesson about the consequences of his mendacious ways.

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