Mansuetude

Mansuetude

manˈso͞oəˌto͞od

Noun

  • Meekness; gentleness.

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Example Sentences

“Grant always handled difficult situations with the utmost mansuetude.”

“The volunteers received training to learn how to approach the shelter animals with mansuetude.”

“Practicing mansuetude is important when teaching excitable children.”

Word Origin

Latin, late 14th century

Why this word?

“Mansuetude” developed through Late Middle English and Old French, but it originated in the Latin word “mansuetus” (“gentle, tame”), which combines the words “manus” (“hand”) and “suetus” (“accustomed”). While “mansuetude” is an archaic synonym for “gentleness,” other words that use the “manus” root are common in modern English: “manicure” and “manipulation,” for example. However, other “man-” words have different roots. “Maniac,” for one, comes from the Greek “mainesthai,” which means “be mad,” and “manifest” comes from the Latin “manifestare,” which means “make public.”

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