Inimitable

Inimitable

iˈnimədəb(ə)l

Adjective

  • So good or unusual as to be impossible to copy; unique.

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Example Sentences

“His inimitable writing style is simple in structure, yet complex in message.” 

“Her legendary skills on the electric bass are inimitable and an integral part of the band’s success.”

“Vermeer’s works are unparalleled because of his masterly, inimitable ability to paint light.”

Word Origin

Latin, late 15th century

Why this word?

“Inimitable” comes from the Latin “imitari,” meaning “to imitate,” and the prefix “in-,” meaning “not” — English borrowed the word for “unable to be imitated” from French in the 15th century. Since its inception in 1789, the U.S. Treasury Department has endeavored to make its currency as inimitable as possible. To ward off counterfeiters, the Treasury has instituted numerous measures to change the appearance of its bills, including special watermarks, security strips, color-shifting ink, and ongoing tweaks to the paper composition.

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Learn a new word Tenebrous

ˈtenəbrəs