Epigrammatic

Epigrammatic

ˌepəɡrəˈmadik

Adjective

  • Of the nature or in the style of an epigram; concise, clever, and amusing.

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Example Sentences

“Taylor’s epigrammatic wit always garners her lots of attention at parties.”

“He has a distinctly epigrammatic writing style.”

“I’ve filled my home with wall art and decor containing epigrammatic sayings.”

Word Origin

Greek, early 18th century

Why this word?

From quotes on inspirational posters to cinematic one-liners, if something is clever and concise, it can be considered “epigrammatic.” While the modern usage of this word developed from French, its roots are found in the Latin word “epigramma” (“an inscription”) and the Greek words “epigramma” (“an inscription on a tomb or public monument”) and “epigraphen” (“to write on or inscribe”). While it’s an ancient tradition, the epigrammatic style remains popular in modern works. Poet Ogden Nash embraced it with his very brief two-line poem “Fleas,” which simply reads “Adam / Had’em.”

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ˈpyo͞orəl